MEDICAL CANNABIS

Medical cannabis treatment for endometriosis in clinical trial

Medical cannabis treatment for endometriosis in clinical trial

Israeli researchers have already started pre-clinical studies to examine the impact of medical cannabis in the treatment of endometriosis, which affects one in 10 women of childbearing age.

The research is led by Gynica, a company licensed by the Israeli Health Ministry to develop cannabis-based products for women, in cooperation with Lumir Lab, a cannabis research facility in the Biotechnology Park, Hadassah Ein Karem Jerusalem.

Endometriosis affects some 176 million women worldwide. In women with endometriosis, the uterine lining grows outside the uterus, in the fallopian tubes, ovaries and other areas of the abdominal cavity and in the pelvis. These women suffer from severe pain before and during menstruation, bleeding and pain during and after intercourse, dyspepsia and frequent or painful urination.

Anecdotal evidence has shown that women who smoke cannabis find relief from their pain, said Dr. Sari Sagiv, VP of research and development at Gynica. The researchers set out to find out what compounds or combination of compounds of cannabis can potentially address the problem.

Endometriosis is a complicated disease,” she said, as it has a number of factors working together that need to be addressed.

I believe cannabis has enough compounds that can affect a number of factors” of the disease, she said, including reducing pain, inflammation and the risk of recurrence.

The researchers have already tested a variety of cannabis compounds of endometriosis cells in vitro to see how they react to the compounds.

We are trying single or a combination of compounds on these cells” to find out if there is an impact and what it is, she explained. “We have already seen that there are different parts of the compounds that have a lot of impact.”

The researchers are now whittling the compounds down to a “lead candidate,” with which they will start clinical trials.

We already have an indication of what can be a lead candidate to deal with a number of factors that can cure endometriosis, not just address the pain. But she declined to reveal additional details until a patent has been filed. We want to start clinical trials in the third quarter of the year,” Sagiv said.

In parallel with the research process being conducted at Lumir Lab, Gynica is collaborating with Canadian company Strainprint, a firm that specializes in data collection and analysis of the effects of cannabis on various diseases. The companies are working on setting up the world’s largest data collection platform to analyze the effects of cannabis on women.

Lumir Lab is run by Prof. Lumir Hanush, a leading cannabis researcher, who is responsible for some of the most important discoveries made in the field of cannabis active substances. Gynica is led by Prof. Moshe Hod, a gynecologist and president of the European Association of Obstetricians. The firm does R&D specializing in cannabinoids based in the field of gynecology.

Israel has one of the world’s most progressive regulatory frameworks for medical cannabis.

Source: https://www.timesofisrael.com/israeli-researchers-probe-how-cannabis-can-treat-endometriosis/

Is medical cannabis effective as a treatment for endometriosis?

Is medical cannabis effective as a treatment for endometriosis?

By. I.Soussis MD

Studies show that medical cannabis has a positive effect on symptoms of endometriosis and may even stop its proliferation, according to Moshe Hod, a Tel Aviv University medical school professor of obstetrics and gynecology and president of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine. Moshe Hod is also head of Gynica, an Israeli startup specializing in cannabis-based solutions in the field of women’s health.

According to Gynica, the female reproductive system contains the most endocannabinoid receptors in the human body, after the brain.

Gynica is the first company that will carry out research and development at the newly licensed Lumir Lab.

Israel is extending its reputation as a world leader in medical cannabis research with the establishment of Lumir Lab (a cannabinoid research lab) at the campus of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Cannabinoids is one of the active ingredients unique to the cannabis plant.

The lab is headed by Czech analytic chemist Lumír Ondřej Hanuš, one of the world’s leading cannabinoids researchers.

Gynica and the Lumir Lab will collaborate on a treatment for endometriosis, a disease common in women that is defined by abnormal extrauteral growths of uterine endometrial tissue and associated with severe pain. Partly because how the abnormal growths become associated with pain is poorly understood, the pain is difficult to alleviate without resorting to hormones or surgery.

Recent studies showed that sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers sprout branches to innervate the abnormal growths. This situation, together with the knowledge that the endocannabinoid system is involved in uterine function and dysfunction and that exogenous cannabinoids were once used to alleviate endometriosis-associated pain, suggests that the endocannabinoid system is involved in both endometriosis and its associated pain.

Approximately 180 million women suffer from endometriosis worldwide.

“More research is needed in order to understand the mechanisms of action and identify which active cannabinoids most effectively eliminate endometriotic lesions, prevent recurrence and reduce pain with no negative impact on the ovulation cycle” professor Moshe Hod said.

“Currently, the vast majority of the cannabis products available in various markets have no scientific basis, which prevents the medical community from supporting the legitimacy of treatments based on cannabis,” said Hod. “We aim to provide tools and solutions that are not currently available.”

Israel has one of the world’s most progressive regulatory frameworks for medical cannabis.

Sources:

https://www.israel21c.org/endometriosis-latest-target-for-medical-cannabis-research/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2972363/

Image credit: https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/endometriosis2

 

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